2011 Confin 2011 Reserve Sauvignon Blanc, Chile
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2011 Confin 2011 Reserve Sauvignon Blanc, Chile

Wine Details

Vineyard

Varietal

Style

Region

Chile

Vintages

Wine Description

This is an exceptional wine from the Anakena Winery in Chile. Slightly herbaceous with hints of lemon-grass, vanilla, sweet bell pepper, grapefruit, lime, melon oak, smooth....

Winemaking was first introduced to Chile by Spanish settlers in the 1500’s, but it wasn’t until the 1980’s that much of the world had their first sips of Chilean wine. At this time, Chile began exporting its wine reserves after strict trade barriers were lifted that once prevented wines to be released from Chile. Since then, Chile has experience remarkable growth. Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc are the most prominent white grape varieties.. 

This wine may have a formation of tartrate crystals. The formation of tartrate crystals are actually a sign of a good wine as these crystals form when tartaric acid and potassium, which are both found naturally in wine, form together under cold conditions to form potassium bitartrate. This can be prevented by `cold stabilization` - a process in which the winery freeze the wine, which causes this precipitate, and filter it out before bottling. A quality wine is more likely to have tartrates as the winery will not want to over process their wines, but instead have all the flavour intended from all the elements in the grapes. These tartrates are odourless, tasteless and harmless - care just has to be taken when pouring if you do not wish to ingest these. NB These tartrates are the same substance found in cream of tartar used for cooking and baking.

Shipping Information

Free shipping with a purchase of 12 bottles or more.

Free shipping with a purchase of 12 bottles bottles or more.

Vineyard

Varietal

Style

Region

Chile

Vintages

This is an exceptional wine from the Anakena Winery in Chile. Slightly herbaceous with hints of lemon-grass, vanilla, sweet bell pepper, grapefruit, lime, melon oak, smooth....

Winemaking was first introduced to Chile by Spanish settlers in the 1500’s, but it wasn’t until the 1980’s that much of the world had their first sips of Chilean wine. At this time, Chile began exporting its wine reserves after strict trade barriers were lifted that once prevented wines to be released from Chile. Since then, Chile has experience remarkable growth. Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc are the most prominent white grape varieties.. 

This wine may have a formation of tartrate crystals. The formation of tartrate crystals are actually a sign of a good wine as these crystals form when tartaric acid and potassium, which are both found naturally in wine, form together under cold conditions to form potassium bitartrate. This can be prevented by `cold stabilization` - a process in which the winery freeze the wine, which causes this precipitate, and filter it out before bottling. A quality wine is more likely to have tartrates as the winery will not want to over process their wines, but instead have all the flavour intended from all the elements in the grapes. These tartrates are odourless, tasteless and harmless - care just has to be taken when pouring if you do not wish to ingest these. NB These tartrates are the same substance found in cream of tartar used for cooking and baking.