Back
2009 Birichino Malvasia Bianca Monterey
2 Ratings
Detail
2 Ratings
2009 Birichino Malvasia Bianca Monterey

Wine Details

Vintages

2011 2010 2008

Wine Description

Temperamentally, we are very sympathetic with the ideals of the Natural Wine Movement. Malvasia bianca, however, apart from being highly exotic and headturningly lovely, vexingly turns on its head the notion of Natural Winemaking. Our task list reads something like this: 1A] grow the grapes in a spot and in such a fashion as to have potential for clusters oozing with complexity, mineral crunch and perfume, yet capable of revealing these virtues with elegance and balance; 1B] pick ripe enough to achieve read more...Temperamentally, we are very sympathetic with the ideals of the Natural Wine Movement. Malvasia bianca, however, apart from being highly exotic and headturningly lovely, vexingly turns on its head the notion of Natural Winemaking. Our task list reads something like this: 1A] grow the grapes in a spot and in such a fashion as to have potential for clusters oozing with complexity, mineral crunch and perfume, yet capable of revealing these virtues with elegance and balance; 1B] pick ripe enough to achieve all the good stuff, but not so ripe as to end up with a dearth of acidity and clarity, or an excess of alcohol; 2] wring every sliver of aromatic potential out of the skins and pulp between the moment of harvest and the initiation of fermentation; 3] try to act like a nervous yet tolerant parent and hope no one falls out of a tree or develops a lifelong fondness for Twinkies. Steps 1A, 1B and 3 progress pretty much au naturel. Step 2 is our own little black box of expertise. We pick and hold the grapes in such a way as to extract the full whack all of the terpenes and other highly aromatic compounds which distinguish varieties such as malvasia, muscat, riesling, etc. We employ a combination of gentle Champagne and long escalation press cycles to cajole all the aromatic potential, without ending up with a bitter, brown, high pH mess. The entire process has been imagined to maximize the flavor and complexity resident in the grapes themselves, without adding anything not there in the first place. On one hand, this seems nothing if not an extraordinary effort to mine that which is wholly natural, what the Burgundians might reverently call” The Hand of God” – that which produces Burgundy. On the other hand , it is not something one might expect to occur spontaneously in Nature, and thus constitutes what the Burgundians might pejoratively refer to as “The Hand of Man” – that which produces Bordeaux. Finally, we are great proponents of extended yet judicious lees contact and frequent bâtonnage, which here creates a lovely, creamy texture as a foil to Little Malvasia’s nervy acidity. We are not trying to do as little as possible. We try to bring to the bottle as much of what is good as possible and nothing else – and in the end, as with all of life’s great endeavors, find harmony in the end result. (hide)

Shipping Information

Free shipping with a purchase of 12 bottles or more.

Free shipping with a purchase of 12 bottles bottles or more.

Vineyard

Birichino Amici

Varietal

Malvasia Bianca

Style

White Wine

Vintages

2011 2010 2008

Temperamentally, we are very sympathetic with the ideals of the Natural Wine Movement. Malvasia bianca, however, apart from being highly exotic and headturningly lovely, vexingly turns on its head the notion of Natural Winemaking. Our task list reads something like this: 1A] grow the grapes in a spot and in such a fashion as to have potential for clusters oozing with complexity, mineral crunch and perfume, yet capable of revealing these virtues with elegance and balance; 1B] pick ripe enough to achieve read more...Temperamentally, we are very sympathetic with the ideals of the Natural Wine Movement. Malvasia bianca, however, apart from being highly exotic and headturningly lovely, vexingly turns on its head the notion of Natural Winemaking. Our task list reads something like this: 1A] grow the grapes in a spot and in such a fashion as to have potential for clusters oozing with complexity, mineral crunch and perfume, yet capable of revealing these virtues with elegance and balance; 1B] pick ripe enough to achieve all the good stuff, but not so ripe as to end up with a dearth of acidity and clarity, or an excess of alcohol; 2] wring every sliver of aromatic potential out of the skins and pulp between the moment of harvest and the initiation of fermentation; 3] try to act like a nervous yet tolerant parent and hope no one falls out of a tree or develops a lifelong fondness for Twinkies. Steps 1A, 1B and 3 progress pretty much au naturel. Step 2 is our own little black box of expertise. We pick and hold the grapes in such a way as to extract the full whack all of the terpenes and other highly aromatic compounds which distinguish varieties such as malvasia, muscat, riesling, etc. We employ a combination of gentle Champagne and long escalation press cycles to cajole all the aromatic potential, without ending up with a bitter, brown, high pH mess. The entire process has been imagined to maximize the flavor and complexity resident in the grapes themselves, without adding anything not there in the first place. On one hand, this seems nothing if not an extraordinary effort to mine that which is wholly natural, what the Burgundians might reverently call” The Hand of God” – that which produces Burgundy. On the other hand , it is not something one might expect to occur spontaneously in Nature, and thus constitutes what the Burgundians might pejoratively refer to as “The Hand of Man” – that which produces Bordeaux. Finally, we are great proponents of extended yet judicious lees contact and frequent bâtonnage, which here creates a lovely, creamy texture as a foil to Little Malvasia’s nervy acidity. We are not trying to do as little as possible. We try to bring to the bottle as much of what is good as possible and nothing else – and in the end, as with all of life’s great endeavors, find harmony in the end result. (hide)

  • Profile-placeholder
    kimmer808

    Recommended by Chuck Furuya Star Advertiser 1June 2011. like Sauvignon blanc or Pinot grigio.

    almost 3 years
Expert Reviews
  • Wine Enthusiast
    Rating: 90pts Editor's Choice Best Buy - As reviewed by Wine Enthusiast on 12/01/10. Malvasia is an aromatic variety, like Riesling or Muscat. This wine is bone dry and brims with mouth-cleansing acidity. Flavorwise, it’s all oranges and tangerines, with hints of honeysuckle and white pepper. There’s something tangy and layered that makes it terrifically interesting. Try as a refreshing alternative to tart wines, like Sauvignon Blanc or Pinot Grigio. - S.H. (12/1/2010) - 90