Detail
21 Ratings
Calera Mills Vineyard Pinot Noir Mount Harlan
$58.99 USD
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Wine Details

Vineyard

Calera Wine

Varietal

Pinot Noir

Style

Red

Wine Description

(From 2010 Vintage) Firm, dark and intense, well-centered on wild berry, savory herb, tea and spice, this comes together on the vibrant, persistent finish.

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    opened mild fulness after a while developed a rich fullness enjoyable fruit

    about 1 year
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    love it!

    about 1 year
Expert Reviews
Read all 3 expert reviews
  • Appellation America
    This Pinot Noir from the Ryan Vineyard - the youngest of Calera’s Mt. Harlan vineyards - is already showing wonderful depth. Planted in 1998 and 2001 on Calera’s limestone soils, this is a Pinot perfectly in balance and made for the long haul (as are mostly all of Calera’s wines. It’s very dark in color with surprisingly sweet oak, baking spices and floral notes in the nose. But the wood is barely detectable on the palate where the dusky, complex and mineral layers supersede it. It has a big, substantial texture for long-term aging for up to 15 years or so. For now, hold onto it for a couple of years to allow it to settle in. A potentially great Pinot Noir. Only the fourth Ryan to be released, the vineyard is already showing maturity. As a measure of its balance, the pH - an indicator of acidity - is a reasoned 3.58, while the stated alcohol, at 14.2 percent, is in check. Only 18 percent of new François Freres Burgundian barrels were utilized for 16 months and the wine was bottled unfiltered. Only a little more than 1,400 cases were produced. (note: tasted from 375ml bottles)
  • Connoisseurs' Guide to California Wines
    On first glance, this almost gangly young Pinot Noir impresses as being a bit narrow and less than complex, but, when given a chance to bloom, it reveals increasingly rich fruit and scattered suggestions of herbs, spice, dried flowers and toast. Quite firm on the palate, yet with a good sense of extract, it is simply too young for drinking any time soon and will not reach its best for five or more years.
  • Wine Spectator